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Thread: Beginners' room

  1. #21
    ann Guest

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    You don't know how true that rings! She has carried the most enormous burden and largely because she just puts up with other people's behavour. Her back is strong - so she does the carrying, but now it's just all too much and when I saw her this week I could have cried. Thank you Willow - Leonard is right, that IS cool!

  2. #22

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    Hi Hilary,

    I've noticed that several of the novice members have indicated their desire for mentoring and FWIW, I am willing to contribute in that capacity should you be making a list(and checking it twice). *grins*

    Namaste,
    Leonard

  3. #23

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    Dear Hilary and Mick thank you so much for your help ... both answers make a lot of sense to me... And now that my PC is back to normal I will visit Mick site often and learn more about the amazing world of dreams?
    Thank you
    God Bless

  4. #24
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    I think every good beginners room should have pictures on the walls. Showing far-away countries, crafts, landscapes, anything the teacher might use for clarifying his words.
    When I was small, there were those pictures, and they were great to contemplate when lessons were very dull.
    So I will put all the hexagrams on the walls.


    The name of hexagram 1, is a picture of the sun at dawn. The circle with a line across, or sometimes a dot in the center, is the sun. The line just below it is the surface of the earth.
    The long ?stem? with ?roots? and ?leaves? is a picture of hanging vegetation: jungle. Others say it is a picture of pennants. In all cultures pennants are used to show ?here he/we/the big celebration is?.
    And finally, at the bottom at left, there is the sign for breath or vapor. The sun causes the dampness to dissolve in the air. But it can also scorch the earth.
    The beginning of the day is a symbol for time, timing, the structure of the world.


    Hexagram 2 has at left a clog of earth, or maybe it is an earth altar. This altar was very important in ancient China. It was a square mound in front of the palace, and every expedition started with a sacrifice to the earth god.
    At right is a picture of a lightning bolt. It is nowadays written the same as a character meaning ?stretch-out?, so that can just as well be its meaning. Makes sense too. But I think it is a way to describe the energy living in the earth. It also means spirit or ghost.
    The character depicts the energy in the earth, the power of nature, its vital force.

    LiSe

  5. #25
    cheiron Guest

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    Dear Heylise
    I was just ready for this beautiful immagery...

    I am struggling over a difficult reading.

    Thanks - it inspired me

    --Kevin

  6. #26
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    These two hexagrams are about the first time the great earth-energy is touched by the forming power of heaven.


    Hexagram 3 is a picture of the very first sprouting of a seed. A stem, two seed-leaves and a bud where the real plant starts to develop. This is the moment of the highest sprouting power, the energy has been awakened, but there is no individual form yet.


    Hexagram 4, from top to bottom: plants, a cover, a pig. The meanings range from to cover, cloudy sky, ignorant, immature, dodder, to (pronounced a little different) deceive, to cheat, make a wild guess. Wang HongYuan says it is a picture of a hunter disguised in an animal skin. Another possibility: a pig, which can run around freely on a yard makes her own nest, a big pile of branches with leaves. In a hollow inside she has her piglets. An as yet undeveloped and invisible source of livelihood for the farmer.
    Here too the energy has been awakened, but it is the mental potential. Huge too, but also without form yet. So this is not only the immature young child, but also the sage, who managed to discard all restricting forms and returned to the source.

    LiSe

  7. #27
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    Hexagram 6. At left is a mouth with sound coming out of it: words. At right a character which means public or fair. But this character is also a title of nobility, Gong, a chief of a fief, the highest title below the emperor in ancient Zhou times. It was also used for the venerable ancestors. Maybe the Gong acted as judge when people could not agree, or his duty was to maintain fairness. Gong is composed of mouth (the little square), and two lines which mean ?divide? or eight (the number which can be divided several times). On some very old graphs the mouth is between the two lines: a verdict between two sides.


    Hexagram 7. The left part is rolling, waving, but the meaning is not certain. The part at right is probably a banner, but it can also mean a skirt or turn around an axis. On oracle bones shi was written as the left part only, and as a complete character on its own it means testes or buttocks, with the extended meaning 'military'. Probably close to the meaning 'having guts'. Another possibility: a kind of ceremonial object (!).
    A shi was not a complete army, but a division. Usually there were three shi, one at right, one in the middle, and one at left. The king often divined which one he should join. Shi means also: military camp, big hall, model, example, master, teacher, tutor, to imitate; a specialist (med., music, paint or divining), local administration chief, high functionary, superior in rank. Shi lu, the names of hexagrams 7 and 56 combined: a body of 2500 troops.
    A specialist .. so it includes also the army of talents one has to organize and use to fight for a living.

    LiSe

  8. #28

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    Uau this is great....
    Thank You LiSe

  9. #29
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    By mistake I skipped hexagram 5. It should have been together with 6.
    Hex.5 is about how to wait for what you need, hex.6 is about how to fight for what you need.


    Hexagram 5. The upper part is 'rain' (heaven and drops), the lower part a beard. But in Wang-HongYuan I found two apparently older characters. One seems a man and drops or something like that, the other one a man standing below rain. Maybe the man with drops is a person getting wet.
    A beard or hair-growing seems to be used for waiting too. But the man with or below the rain makes most sense.
    In China there were often torrents of rain, sometimes resulting in a flood. Many people lived in pits, dug out hollows, so one can imagine how it is when the rain refuses to stop.
    When it rains, on the fields or in the head, one has to wait, but a lot depends on how one waits. Don?t wait in low places, or in a low spirit.

    Hexagram 7 and 8 are both about protecting territory. How to defend it and how to organize it.


    Hexagram 8. The character represents two people standing or walking behind each other or side by side. Original meaning: to juxtapose. Later: to be close to, compare, equal, similar, to be neighbors, join forces, to be the origin of, follow, concordant, partisan, to form a clique (opposite to zhou, universal), unit of 5 families.
    When Yu had conquered the flood, he called all the chiefs of the clans together, in order to organize the state. They were probably all very independent, but only cooperation could prevent floods, or conquer them.
    One of Bi?s meanings is ?to be the origin of?, and Yu?s assembly was the origin and the joining of forces of the state of Xia

    LiSe

  10. #30
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    Hexagram 9, Xiao Chu. The three little dots above are the character ?small?: three grains of sand or rice, millet, whatever.
    The second character has at the top a drawing of strands of silk. At the bottom is a round or square field with dots marking the presence of a crop. So it can indicate the harvest of silk and crops. The ?field? can also mean hunt and ?silk? is sometimes used for ?small?, so ?small crops? is also possible. And still others say it is a character meaning dark or green, but in the oldest pictures it does not look like that.
    The most common meaning of Chu is livestock, or to raise livestock. Other meanings: nourish, support, cherish, suppress, accumulate, store, gather, keep, meadow, put out to pasture in nature, conform with, follow, tolerate, support, docile. Collect, store, save up, hoard, reserve, accumulate.


    Hexagram 10, Lü.
    The character represents a corpse or a sitting man (at left), who is impersonating the deceased person at a funeral (he sure had to 'behave'). A foot on a road : going. Of the road only one side with side-road is left over. A boat (top right), also indicating a shoe: Chinese shoes look like boats. And another foot (bottom right). The oldest form of this character was probably simpler, but I could not find one.
    LÜ means: shoe, sandal, wear shoes, to tread, follow a track, traverse, accomplish, (right) conduct, virtue, rite, hold an office, domain (of a prince), path.
    In Chinese astrology the third branch is Yin, and its animal is the Tiger. The meanings of yin are: behaviour, gait, ritual politeness, being full of respect for, revere (the spirits).
    In China one?s way of treading and the tiger are closely related: the tiger is a symbol of supple movements (Tiger Balm for the muscles!).

    LiSe

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