...life can be translucent

Menu

I Ching Tarot

ogalkin

visitor
Joined
Apr 20, 2009
Messages
21
Reaction score
1
I've accumulated a few links related to a pretty good I Ching Tarot images which I want to share with you.

"I Ching Holitzka" by Klaus Holitzka
Holitzka.jpg


"I Ching Tarot: Game Of Divination And Discovery" by Kwan Lau
ij10.gif
ij18.gif
ij58.gif
ij33.gif


I think it is pretty helpful to have such tarot cards at your fingertips when making a divination, just to help yourself to produce an image in your mind. What do you think?
 

hilary

Administrator
Joined
Apr 8, 1970
Messages
17,027
Reaction score
2,298
One of the things I like about tarot is the possibility of carrying a card with you as a visible, tangible reminder of a reading. So these could help with that... though 'Bewitchment - stay sober and alert!' doesn't seem to me to have much to do with Hexagram 18.

Other I Ching cards -
Cristina Bertrand - I Ching Images for Meditation
(These are available from Amazon.com but not .co.uk.)
Tao Oracle deck

Any more?
 

Trojina

Moderator
Clarity Supporter
Joined
May 29, 2006
Messages
23,644
Reaction score
2,571
I've accumulated a few links related to a pretty good I Ching Tarot images which I want to share with you.



I think it is pretty helpful to have such tarot cards at your fingertips when making a divination, just to help yourself to produce an image in your mind. What do you think?

Wondering why you are calling them 'I Ching tarot images' and 'tarot cards' as they aren't tarot cards they are I Ching cards...I mean Tarot is a whole different system of divination using cards which doesn't mean that anything put on a card becomes Tarot or related to Tarot

They may be helpful for a beginner i guess to use alongside a book..
 

freemanc

visitor
Joined
May 9, 1970
Messages
92
Reaction score
0
I own both of these decks, actually. I really love the Holitzka deck, though I don't use it for divining, not in terms of doing a layout. I use it for either sort of laying out patterns among the hexagrams (The deck is indeed one card per hexagram), or I use it just to have something concrete to look at. Sometimes they strike me as right on; sometimes they don't, but they never really bother me or "hurt my eyes". I think it was nervy of a westerner to use brush art to approach a Chinese oracle, in a coals-to-Newcastle sort of way, but they pull it off, at least for me. It seems fairly literate about the Yijing and when the narrative or image to use wasn't obvious, they went for abstraction, which seems wise. They've become a bit of an institution, I think. And they're still in print.

I note that I haven't said how very, very pretty they are. At worst they're decorative-pretty; some cards are really beautiful.
 

ogalkin

visitor
Joined
Apr 20, 2009
Messages
21
Reaction score
1
Wondering why you are calling them 'I Ching tarot images' and 'tarot cards' as they aren't tarot cards they are I Ching cards...I mean Tarot is a whole different system of divination using cards which doesn't mean that anything put on a card becomes Tarot or related to Tarot

They may be helpful for a beginner i guess to use alongside a book..

It's not me calling them like that. They are called like that by the people who made them, because of the visual similarity with tarot cards.

Here is few another examples:

Tao Oracle by Ma Deva Padma:
yicard1.jpg


Yi-King, Tarot oriental de Paul Iki:
yicard2.jpg


I Ching Cards by Helen Walker:
yicard4.jpg


I Ching Dell'Amore by Nishavdo, Rishu and Videha:
yicard6.jpg


Visual I Ching by Oliver Perrottet:
yicard7.jpg


The I Ching Pack by Anthony Clark and Richard Gill:
yicard3.jpg


I think it is useful not only for beginners... You know it is always cool to have some influential image to a hexagram.

Oleg
 

Sparhawk

One of those men your mother warned you about...
Clarity Supporter
Joined
Sep 17, 1971
Messages
5,110
Reaction score
81

ogalkin

visitor
Joined
Apr 20, 2009
Messages
21
Reaction score
1

hilary

Administrator
Joined
Apr 8, 1970
Messages
17,027
Reaction score
2,298
Does anyone actually use these for consultation?

(Just remembered I have those Perrottet cards somewhere... and also the 'Writer's I Ching' came with cards in the back, though I can't think where I put them. All of which probably shows how visually oriented I'm not.)
 

Sparhawk

One of those men your mother warned you about...
Clarity Supporter
Joined
Sep 17, 1971
Messages
5,110
Reaction score
81
I'm sure lots of people do. Not sure of those here though. I think Bruce mentioned using cards for visualization but not sure.

Visual aids such as cards are good association triggers. It is often overlooked how visual the Yijing can be. Much more so than even the Tarot, IMHO.
 

Sparhawk

One of those men your mother warned you about...
Clarity Supporter
Joined
Sep 17, 1971
Messages
5,110
Reaction score
81
also the 'Writer's I Ching' came with cards in the back, though I can't think where I put them.

What? I have that book and don't remember it having any cards. Did they release a new edition with them? Gotta check that one out.
 

neegula

visitor
Joined
Nov 20, 2009
Messages
549
Reaction score
0
hi all,
thanks sooooo much for this thread:D

i didn't even know that I Ching Tarot (or cards) existed blush:
i hope i'll bump into one of Them one day or the other, can't imagine where to find them in italy...
 

frank_r

visitor
Joined
Jun 20, 1971
Messages
639
Reaction score
14
I sometimes use cards when doing a consultation.


53.jpg

This are the cards from Han Boering a Dutch I Ching author.
On the cards itself are different aspects of the hexagram. On the left the nucleur hexagram, on the right the Formhexagrams(or shadowhexagrams as Karcher is naming them http://www.onlineclarity.co.uk/friends/showthread.php?t=10019), below that the trigram jumps what makes a hexagram. And the circle and astrix in the 8 pointed flower is telling where they stand in the king Wen cycle.



DSC_0405.jpg


Then you put the cards in the patron of the Lo Shu on the cloth and then read the answer starting in the east as in the King Wen sequence very interesting way the make consultation because then every card is explaining a part of the question. When the cards have only one line difference then there is a connection between the cards.
 

Sparhawk

One of those men your mother warned you about...
Clarity Supporter
Joined
Sep 17, 1971
Messages
5,110
Reaction score
81
That's really nice.
 

hilary

Administrator
Joined
Apr 8, 1970
Messages
17,027
Reaction score
2,298
What? I have that book and don't remember it having any cards. Did they release a new edition with them? Gotta check that one out.
I think perhaps there might be two called 'Writer's I Ching'. This is by Jessica Page Morrell... I reviewed it somewhere. (Not wondrous.)
...
On the cards itself are different aspects of the hexagram. On the left the nucleur hexagram, on the right the Formhexagrams(or shadowhexagrams as Karcher is naming them http://www.onlineclarity.co.uk/friends/showthread.php?t=10019)
Minor correction - Karcher calls these the Ideal hexagram. Shadows are unrelated - the reflection in the mirrored/reversed sequence (1's shadow is 64, 2's is 63, etc).
 

heylise

Supporter
Clarity Supporter
Joined
Sep 15, 1970
Messages
3,125
Reaction score
136
I use the ones Frank mentioned, of Han Boering. When I have a really important big question, then these cards are great. They give a wealth of information and an overview of the whole situation. I can use one reading for weeks, and every time I discover something new. Lots of patterns get visible. One single reading cannot do that, and follow-up readings are not a whole with the first one. Rather 'extra information', not as clearly a part of the pattern the way these cards are.
 

frank_r

visitor
Joined
Jun 20, 1971
Messages
639
Reaction score
14
Minor correction - Karcher calls these the Ideal hexagram. Shadows are unrelated - the reflection in the mirrored/reversed sequence (1's shadow is 64, 2's is 63, etc).

Hilary you are right the technique of Karcher is totally different, I thought they were the same but they are not. It is also something different than the ideal hexagrams. The one I mean is the so called formhexagram then you look where the trigram stand in the Fu Shi sequence and put the trigrams from the King Wen in the same spot then you get a new hexagram. Then you get information in what form the hexagram is presenting itself in the world.
The ideal is the other way around from King Wen to Fu Shi.

The form hexagram of 46 is 8. the shadow 19 is and the ideal is 61.

I already started a thread about this technique http://www.onlineclarity.co.uk/friends/showthread.php?t=3856
 
Last edited:

Clarity,
Office 17622,
PO Box 6945,
London.
W1A 6US
United Kingdom

Phone/ Voicemail:
+44 (0)20 3287 3053 (UK)
+1 (561) 459-4758 (US).

Top