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Thread: Takashima Ekidan

  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparhawk View Post
    Ladies and Gentlemen,

    The problem is that many Google Books full view PDF's are available only to US viewers.
    ah, that figures! Thank you Luis

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparhawk View Post
    Ladies and Gentlemen,

    The problem is that many Google Books full view PDF's are available only to US viewers. I can send you a copy Charly. Send me your email address and I'll do it later.
    I had no idea this was the case because I thought Google tried to treat everyone the same. This limitation must be a consequence of the complexity of copyright laws.

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    Okeydokey,

    I uploaded the Takashima Ekidan file to my site:

    http://yitoons.com/pdf/Takashima_Ekidan.pdf

    Leave a flower at the door...
    Last edited by sparhawk; November 21st, 2010 at 04:34 AM.

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  5. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by pocossin View Post
    I had no idea this was the case because I thought Google tried to treat everyone the same. This limitation must be a consequence of the complexity of copyright laws.
    Yes, unfortunately. When Google started scanning whole libraries, many authors and publishers sued them. In the settlement, one of the rules was, because of the different copyright laws in different countries, that access to full view files would be regional. Not precisely like this, but, In a nutshell, if it was scanned in the US, only US viewers would have access to it.

  6. #55

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    hi Luis,
    Thank you for making available to all of us!

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    Default Contents of the Takashima Ekidan

    TITLE PAGE i

    INTRODUCTORY REMARKS iii

    CONTENTS xv

    PROCESS OF DIVINATION 1

    I. KEN 6
    Two Affairs Decided by a Single Divination 8
    My Resolution at the Beginning of Meiji 10
    Agriculture of the 16th. Year of Meiji 12
    The Negotiation with China By Count Ito, Ambassador 13

    II. KON 16
    Fate of the Iwashimizu Temple for Mr. Fukushima 18
    My Views for the Kyodo-Unyu-Gaisha through the Divination 20

    III. CHUN 23
    On the Franco-Prussian War 24
    My Own Fate, in Prison 28
    Fate of a Certain Bank 30
    War between China & France 31
    Takashima's Misinterpretation 34

    IV. MO 37
    Mode of Education of a Son 38
    Return of Our Ransom from America. 39

    V. JU 43
    Fortune of Nishimura, Mitsushe, and Me, while at Tsukudajima 44
    Suicide of Mr. Goichi Nakano 47

    VI. SHO 49

    VII. SHI 51
    Mr. M. Mutsu's Views 52
    Selection of Ambassador for China 53

    VIII. HI 55

    IX. SHOCHIKU 57

    X. RI 59
    Corean Accident 60

    XI. TAI 64
    Mr. Sugi's Going to Hawaii 65

    XII. HI 69
    punishment of Masajiro Suga 70
    Fortune of Shintoism 71
    On Supplying the Military Caste with Occupations 73

    XIII. DO-JIN 76
    My Fate and Future Course in 3rd. of Meiji 77
    Comparison of the Writings of the Three Writers, Mesjrs. Iohiroku, Sanshu, and Mei-Kaku; and also the Writing of Mr. Soejima 82

    XIV. TAI-YU 85
    Discovery of Lost Money 86

    XV. KEN 88

    XVI. YO 90
    My Punishment while in Prison 91

    XVII. ZUI 93
    Marriage of Miss 94

    XVIII. KO 96

    XIX. RIN 98

    XX. KWAN 100
    Existence or Nonexistence of Diviners in the Country 101

    XXI. JEI-KO 103

    XXII. HI 105
    Sickness of Mr. Sanzaemon Shimoirjura 106
    The National Assembly 107

    XXIII. HAKU 118

    XXIV. FUKU 120

    XXV. BUBO 122
    Keyamura, a Wrestler 123
    The Boundary Disputation between China and Russia 124
    Contest between Main and Branch of a - Family 126
    The Traveller Obtains a Cattle and the Villager a Trouble 127

    XXVI. TAI-CHIKU 129


    XXVII. YI 131
    Arbitration of Yokohama Gas Question 132
    Electric Light 134

    XXVIII. TAI-KWA 135
    The Japanese and Chinese Intrication 136

    XXIX. KAN 140
    The Expectation of Money in Prison 141
    Mob of Saitamaken 143

    XXX. RI 145
    The Rebel of Saga 146

    XXXI. KAN 148
    The Result of His Loan, for Lord ---- 149

    XXXII. KO 151
    The Accusation against China 152
    Rain or No Rain in Aug. 1886 155
    The Divination of Corea 157
    Destination of a Loan 158

    XXXIII. TON 159
    Mr. Nagai's Baby 160
    The English and Russian Engagement at Afghanistan 161

    XXXIV. TAI-SO 165
    Rebel of Hagi 166
    Calamity from Thief of Mr. Sugi, Vice-Minister of Imperial Household Department 167

    XXXV. SHIN 168

    XXXVI. MEI-I 170
    Taxation of Nineteenth of Meiji 171
    Marriage of Mr. So-and-so 176
    Fortune of Buddhism 177

    XXXVII. KA-JIN 180

    XXXVIII. KEI 182
    A Certain Affair of a Certain Person 183
    Wife and Daughter of a Rich Family 185

    XXXIX. KEN 189
    How to Pay His Debt for a Gentleman 190
    Cholera at Yokohama in 1886 193

    XL. KAI 195
    Debt of Yamashiroya Wasuke 196
    Anticipation of Koshen-Osho's Topic of Conversation, before seeing Him 199

    XLI. SON 201
    Mr. Sanenobu Sugi's Sickness 202
    Resolution of Mr. 203
    Destination of Yokohama Iron Works 204

    XLII. EKI 20G
    Market of Tanegami 207

    XLIII. KWAI 209
    Management of Treacherors to a Merchant. 210
    Result of Debate of Mr. 212
    Utilization of Mr. Amamiya's Earnings 213

    XLIV. K0 217
    Entangling of Eastern Europe 218
    Kindness Rewarded by Anger 223

    XLV. SUI 224
    Railway Bridge over Todagawa of Uyeno Line 225
    Will a Certain Nobleman be Able to Visit Foreign Lands? 227

    XLVI. SHO 229

    XLVII. KON 231
    Will Mr. be Infected with Cholera ? 232
    Death of a Cholerate 233

    XLVIII. SEI 235
    Life of a Nobleman 236
    Disputation among the Fishmongers of Yokohama 238
    China and France on the Anam Affair 239

    XLIX. KAKU 241
    Which Cause to Belong, for a Certain
    House at the Restoration War 242

    L. TEI 245
    The Detention of Messrs. Fujita and Naka-no 246
    Marriage of a Friend 247
    Tumult in Corea 248

    LI. SHIN 250
    Difficulty of Lord 251
    Where have Mr. G. Yamada's parents and
    Sister Gone? 253

    LII. GON 257
    Fortune of an Officer 258
    Lioking at Fuji from Peak Otome 259

    LIII. ZEN 261
    Intermixture of Foreigners 262
    Mr. Juichiro Wada's Fortune 267
    Disease of Mr. Ujitomo Toda's Mother 267

    LIV. KIMAI 269
    Life of a Public Story-Teller, Choka Ito 270

    LV. HO 272
    Condition of Yokohama Foreign Coin
    Transaction Company 273

    LVI. RYO 276
    Warning of Fire in a Coal-Mine 277
    Fortune of Mr. Unsho 279
    Fortune of a Nobleman's Friend 281

    LVII. SON 283
    The 4th. of " Son " is the Profit of Three Times the Capital 284

    LVIII. DA 286

    LIX. KWAN 288
    Shipwreck of Mrs. Kei Oura 289

    LX. SETSU 291
    How to Return His Debt for a Police Officer 292

    LXI. CHU-FU 296
    Marriage of a Nobleman 297

    LXII.SHO-KWA 300
    Petition of Mr. Kikakudo 301
    Petition of the Shintoists' Club 303

    LXIII. KISEI 305
    Affairs of Europe 306
    Delay of Mr. Haruo Sakata's Arrival 312
    Iwaiya's Payment 313

    LXIV. BI-SEI 314
    Subjugation of Corea 315

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    Default An Edited Takashima Biography

    http://mybookshop.0catch.com/xxjul10.htm

    Born on December 24, 1832 as Seisaburou Yakushiji to successful businessman and also diviner father Kaemon Yakushiji who went by the family name of Enshuuya. Mother's name was Kuni. Born in the 30-borikan municipality in Edo that now corresponds to the Central Ginza district of Tokyo metropolis. Although he was the sixth child, three siblings born before him died young, leaving behind two big sisters born and surviving before him, and also making him the "man" of the house. Seisaburou later changed his given name to Kiemon like his father, before changing to Donshou and then further to Kaemon. . . . When he was young, he was influenced by his father's religious practices to study Confusian works. Although they were very difficult to read and complex to understand works, if he read them a few times, he remembered them inside-out. By age 14, Seisaburou began working in his father's lumber and steel production businesses. By the time his father died, he found that his father's business was bleeding red ink. It was partly due to his older sister's husband who was spending money recklessly and a government ordinance of debt-forgiveness, deferrment, and extensions. . . .

    As part of his plan to get his family out of the huge debts, he changed his given name to his father's given name, so that all the business contacts can associate him with his father's businesses. At age 22, he also started a retail lumber yard business which quickly became profitable the year after when Edo was hit by the Big Earthquake of Ansei on November 11, 1855 with magnitude 6.9 which necessitated reconstruction of houses and mansions through which he earned 200,000 ryou of gold coins... but there was a huge storm at the small Japanese country of Morioka where he owned forest and lumber making land that led to the loss of lumber and the refusal of the Morioka government officials to pay for lumbers that were already delivered, through which he lost 200,000 ryou of gold coins. By 1859, he began selling chinawares and other wares at Yokohama city.

    Remember that in Japan, one weight of gold was exchanged for four weights of silver, which made gold relatively cheap compared to silver when compared to the exchange rates in the rest of the world. Foreigners quickly began offering silver to obtain the precious gold, but the Bakufu government realized this disparity in world exchange rate to the Japanese exchange rate and forbade the foreigners from doing so. So, Seisaburou did the exchange for them, at a higher exchange rate but still very profitable for the foreigners. Since it was illegal, he was sent to prison in 1860, and paroled in 1865, although he had no idea that he was going to be released in 1865, since that fear of the unknown is part of the punishment. This is the time he changed his name to Kiemon.

    Since he was banned from Edo, he went to Yokohama and started a lumber yard store. Once British ambassador Harry Smith Parkes (Febr 24, 1828 - March 22, 1885) ordered lumber to make the British embassy, other foreigners began ordering large amount of lumber from his store. In 1867, because there was no hotel for foreigners and the foreign embassy staff, he also made a huge hotel for them.

    By this time, the Morioka clan that refused to pay him had also rebelled against the Bakufu government and was in need of paying 700,000 ryou in gold coins as penalty to the Bakufu government. Since paying that amount of money means that they can't pay for rice and could lead to famine but Seisaburou had the money, they asked him if he'll lend the money, and he magnaniously agreed.

    By 1870, he began discussing the construction of a railway. In order to lower cost of the railway, he began a sea-reclamation project of the Yokohama Harbor to create a shorter route for the train. Also in 1870, a German company applied to start a coal gas powered lighting company. (Coal is burned with steam that creates a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that's carried by pipes to outdoor light posts to make nights light-up.) He didn't want the foreigners to gain a monopoly in Japan, leading him to start his own coal gas company, hiring French engineers to make the plant to manufacture the gas and the pipes for distributing, metering, billing etc which was completed by September 29, 1872. He also started a language school in 1871. He also ran the Aichi Cement Corporation, Hokkaido Colliery and Railway Company, and the agricultural development and settlements in Ishikari and Tokachi among many other enterprises. He seemed to be born under a lucky star, but actually, it was planned that way.

    While he did all this, he was also into divination which he used to determine which business to start and how to proceed with it. A few days before that Big Earthquake of Ansei began, his kid brother's kitchen pot made a sound without anyone present. Using the divination process that he had learned when young from his father, it predicted "fire", and contracted to purchase all the lumbers from every lumber yard around. Then the Earthquake struck a few days later, fire razed everything, and the price of lumber shot through the roof.

    When he was in prison for the illegal exchanging of gold and silver, he also found old divination tools under a tatami carpet and began using it to make divinations. But lacking bamboo, he ripped paper to see what shape they made. Because he was so successful at predicting what was going to happen, he regarded divination as a type of religion. (Ancient oracles and temple priests/priestesses who divined the future did give rise to religions, so it's the same thing.) He was so good at predicting the future that even the Japanese government asked for his divination to predict and see the outcome of the Sino-Japanese War and the Russo-Japanese War, both of which Japan won despite heavy casualties and despite the overwhelmingly inferior Japanese war machines, and this was also reported by the Japanese newspapers. . . . It's said that he also predicted the first Japanese Prime Minister Hirobumi Itou's death and the name of the assassin. But when he failed to divine Hirobumi's intents, he stopped divining other people. He did predict his 1914 death and prepared for his own funeral.

    Shouzan read Seisaburou's book on divination and became a diviner who also became famous for accurately predicting the future, and changed his last name to Takashima. His catch phrase was "Sit-down quietly and the prediction will come true." He did so well that he wrote a book on divination and made his own Takashima Divination Headquarter building. On November 24, 1959, a mentally ill young man visited his building and stabbed him and his eldest son. He died the next morning and his business also suddenly collapsed; everyone thought that he must have been a crooked diviner because he didn't divine his own death like Seisaburou.

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    知日部屋屋主 回覆於 2008/10/22 14:08
    Divination and Meiji Politics: A Reading of Takashima Kaemon’s Takashima Ekidan (My Judgment on the Yijing). By Benjamin Wai-Ming NG.

    Abstract: The use of Yijing oracle in politics and the military had a long tradition in Japanese history and this practice survived in the Meiji period (1868-1912). Meiji leaders consulted the oracle of the Yijing frequently in making major political and military decisions. Takashima Kaemon (1832-1914), a famous entrepreneur and Yijing scholar, served as a semiofficial diviner for Meiji government, consulted by the prime minister, cabinet members, military generals, highranking officials, diplomats, intelligence officers, and judges. Hundreds of political and military oracles have been preserved in the Takashima Ekidan (My Judgment on the Yijing, 1882 first edition, 1901 expanded edition). Through a textual analysis and critical reading of the Takashima Ekidan, this study aims to investigate the role of Yijing divination in Meiji politics, in particular how the Meiji leaders made use of Yijing divination for political purposes and how was it incorporated into late Meiji state ideology. It sheds light on the nature of Meiji modernity and the formation of the so-called “emperor-state” (tennosei) ideology in modern Japan.

    From: http://www.cuhkacs.org/~benng/Bo-Blog/read.php?964

    Benjamin Ng Wai-ming 吳偉明
    Department of Japanese Studies, Chinese University of Hong Kong,
    Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong
    http://chinajapan.org/articles/13.2/13.2ng45-63.pdf
    Many Ngo´s pdf in Steve Marshall´s page.

    This article about Mencius a la japanese might be of interest:

    http://chinajapan.org/articles/13.2/13.2ng45-63.pdf
    From: http://chinajapan.org/archive.html

    Ch.
    Last edited by charly; November 24th, 2010 at 05:26 AM.

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    Takashima's method of casting is similar to the method given in Jou's I Ching, pp. 65-7. By this method there should always be one and only one moving line, but somehow on pages 78, 84, and 154 he gets unchanging hexagrams. Any idea how?

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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by pocossin View Post
    Takashima's method of casting is similar to the method given in Jou's I Ching, pp. 65-7. By this method there should always be one and only one moving line, but somehow on pages 78, 84, and 154 he gets unchanging hexagrams. Any idea how?
    Hi, Tom:

    Don't you believe that Takashima allowed himself some freedom from methods maybe in search of desired results?

    Yours,

    Charly

    P.D. I will post assap something about your birds.
    Ch.

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