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  1. #1
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    Default the sequence of I Ching

    I would like to share my understanding of the sequence as follows and for your reference.

    The sequence 1 - 5

    Qian, the sky and the first hexagram, acts like a founder and leader, who exerts himself strongly and untiringly in order to establish his world. While all the six lines of the hexagram Qian (1) are changing to the feminine, those founders and leaders won’t fight one another for the leadership, since the hexagram is appearing in the form of Kun (2), which is the earth and designated to be submissive, like the earth sustaining the sky.

    The hexagram Kun (2), the earth and the 2nd hexagram, acts like an assistance and adherent, who accommodates all things with a breadth of virtue, and by virtue of which it can be submissive in following the founder and leader, Qian. While it reaches the top, it fights with the dragon of Qian; however eventually the masculine Qian will still be the desired end of the feminine Kun while all the lines of Kun are changing to the masculine. The mate of the masculine Qian and the feminine Kun creates life; therefore Zhun (3) is given birth.

    However the hexagram Zhun (3) is signified as difficulty in initiating, because Kun (2) moved to the northeast, the direction of the trigram Gen, a masculine trigram but with only one masculine line, instead of the northwest, the direction of Qian; therefore Zhun lacks the momentum of masculinity (which tends to move) and must accrue it to be given birth. Line 2 of Zhun in correlation with the masculine line 5 commits to its mission and after ten years (ten steps forward from position 2 of Zhun) the ignorance child of the hexagram Meng (4) is borne and ready for education.

    Upbringing is first important thing to the newborn life. The hexagram Meng (4) offers education, while the hexagram Xu (5) provides food as signified by Xu Gua Zhuan (i.e. the commentary on the sequence). In the era of various schools of thoughts existing and differing from one another, the education offered by Meng is exclusive, which will create conflict. Therefore the hexagram Xu is also signified to wait (as peril lies in front). Only after line 6 of Xu learns to share food and drinks with others at position 5; then it can move forth to the next hexagram Sung (6): litigation due to conflict, wherein it can avoid litigation and seek harmony. The food of Xun can enhance life to cross the peril, while drinking with others will smoothen the relation.
    (to be continued)

    Regards
    Tuck
    www.iching123.om

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    The sequence 6 – 10

    All the lines of the hexagram Song (6) seek reconciliation but line 6, which therefore wins what it wants and believes in litigation but will lose all shortly, because people of the same ground or interest are grouped with a view to joining forces in defending themselves; thus the hexagram Shi (7) is formed.

    In fact, most of time the act of Shi (7) is doomed to defeat or retreat; only the marshal, line 2, who possesses the military power and correlates with the king is awarded with the bestowments three times. Therefore the hexagram Bi (8): imitate and interdependent relationship, steps onto the stage of the I Ching, wherein its lines are designated to seek the intimately independent relationship with others, and line 5, the king, recruits or allies others in an open attitude. Shi is taken for the military action, while Bi is diplomatic measures.

    Water drops flowing to a low-lying land due to the gravity, like that of the dukes submitting to the call of the king, is Bi (8), while the converged water drops become a stream and are reserved in a dam, which is Chu, storage and restraint (to herd the livestock, feed and make them grow stronger). The hexagram Xian Chu (9) means little feeding and storage, as well as the restraint of the small one, wherein the small one (the feminine line 4) services the big ones (the masculine lines) but the small one is not dependable and the masculine will be restrained by the feminine if it counts too much on the feminine. On the other hand, after the small one knows how to play the game with the big one, it can walk behind a tiger and tread the tiger’s tail but it won’t be bitten.

    Things being converged and stored (Chu) without the order of arrival will cause disarray; thus it must be done systematically and orderly, i.e. according to propriety. As a result, the hexagram Lu (10) is granted; Lu is signified as to ‘act in accordance with propriety’, like the tender trigram Dui joyfully walking behind the rigid trigram Qian. In the era of Lu, people’s aspirations are determined according to their ranks (as said in Da Xiang Zhuang: the commentary on the image of the hexagram). Therefore people of those below must be pragmatic and without undesired ambition; after having learnt the lesson of being bitten by tiger in seeking the way moving upward (to the upper trigram, where they must accompany the tiger and the king, line 5), they can and will do what they should, prudently and with dread, and will have no remorse at end.

    Regards
    Tuck
    www.iching123.om

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    This is remarkably clear as you state the ongoing "storyline" and brings images to mind that will make certain points far easier to remember. In my opinion, a very beautiful and useful contribution Tuck Chang. I would really enjoy hearing any of these connections you are able to explain in this way.

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    It is possible to tell an equally coherent story from any sequence of hexagrams. The coherence of any particular story really says nothing about the meaningfulness or validity of the sequence. Anybody who reads Tarot cards already understands this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bradford View Post
    It is possible to tell an equally coherent story from any sequence of hexagrams. The coherence of any particular story really says nothing about the meaningfulness or validity of the sequence. Anybody who reads Tarot cards already understands this.
    Well certainly I've heard many versions of the story of the Tarot cards, which are actually quite new in relation to the Yi and who really knows where they came from.

    Are you saying that there is no one story of the Yi either and many ways to tell the story? I would think there are multiple versions of Yi "tale" that have developed over time. But in relation to the Yi, I don't know even one storyline and I so appreciate hearing this type of explanation as I more easily remember it through the progression of the lines.

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    I assume Bradford means the Fool's journey as in tarot card s. The Fool card ( the beginning of the journey) till the end of his journey ( card World). If we put Major's in a random order, we can tell another story, another journey.

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    No, I don't mean the Fool's journey, or anything structural.
    Any individual Tarot reading juxtaposes a "random" series of numerous cards, out of which the reader spins a coherent story by connecting the dots. But it doesn't mean that those cards "belong" in that order. It's simply what the human brain does for a living. It's what the brain does in the most common forms of dreaming as well.
    The random half of the King Wen sequence is just that - random.

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    Similarly in Tarot, if you want to know what the ten numbers meant you would look for a common denominator in all four of the aces, two's, etc.
    The common denominator is the corresponding Major Arcana -- Ones all reflect aspects of The Magician, Twos all reflect the High Priestess -- these being filtered through the lenses of the different suits. The theory gets complicated with the recognition that the majors are differently arranged in different traditions. The Marseilles tarot, for instance, puts the Fool near the end -- 20 or 21 -- I'm too lazy to look it up. The Thoth Tarot also messes about with the order of the majors -- that's probably the most recent re-organization that is generally recognized.

    Once you learn the order of the majors (in your preferred tradition) and their "story," you can construct a meaning for a minor even though you may not specifically recall the card. Even if I can't recall a meaning for seven of pentacles, I can construe that it concerns physical possessions (pentacles) associated with issues of pride, stubbornness, reward for efforts, and the entire complex of meanings associated with The Chariot.

    The question then becomes... can the same process be used on I Ching? 1 and 2 represent pure forms; 63 represents the ideal arrangement of yang and yin. Assuming one can recall the form of a random hexagram, can one construct a relatively accurate meaning for an individual line without depending on brute memorization?

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    The sequence 16 - 20

    After a person well cultivates himself in the hexagram Qian (15), he can march to the next hexagram Yu (16), wherein it is instrumental in establishing the ducal state and dispatching the troops. Friends of line 4, the representative line of Yu (a person of political charismas), will gather like the hair bound by a clasp, and by virtue of which it can attain great achievements.

    All the lines which are inspired by line 4 of Yu (16) (the source of Yu, a person of political charismas or personal cult) are of ominous omens because they ignore the legitimacy of line 5, the king. Therefore one must be prudent in selecting the right one to follow, and the hexagram Sui (17) means to follow. The masculine line (line 6 of hexagram 12: Pi) descending to the bottom position and the feminine line (line 1 of hexagram 12) ascending to the top position create the bottom trigram Zhen and the upper trigram Dui; the one below moves in following the one above and the one above feels joyful, signifying Sui.

    According to Za Gua Zhuan (the commentary on the coupled hexagrams), Sui (17) is regarded as no past, which is signified as ‘to make adjustments timely and perform correctly according to occasions’, and the mission of hexagram Gu (18) is to remove old aged malpractices, and to put things in order. While the follow of the hexagram Sui is reversed, the bottom trigram Xun prostrates itself in exhibiting submissiveness to the upper trigram Gen: to stop, signifying Gu.

    After those of the hexagram Gu (18) left over by the old generations have been successfully removed, the sovereign returns and descends to the world, wherein masculine lines 1 and 2 occupies the earth domain and move toward the sky domain, like the large ones (the masculine) approaching the small ones (the feminine), and the hexagram of which is named Lin (19): to approach. In Chinese culture the approach of Lin is usually taken for an action which is from an honored position or a higher position.

    Lines 4, 5 and 6 of the hexagram Lin (19) approaching the lines below, like those above approaching those below so as to supervise and manage them, must be done righteously; otherwise calamity exists in August. Once the hexagram Lin is reversed, it becomes hexagram 20, Guan: observation, wherein the masculine line 5 and 6 stays atop like receiving a review or trial on their performances from those below, and the hexagram Guan represents August.

    Regards
    Tuck
    www.iching123.com

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    The sequence 21 - 25

    Example is better than precept. The model set up by those above of the hexagram Guan (20) is the example for those below to follow, while the penal code enacted and enforced in the hexagram Shi Ke (21) is the precept. Shi Ke signifies to bite through (the barrier in the mouth in order to resume its proper function, like that which the penal code is assigned to maintain the social order). Line 5, the founding line and the host line of Shi Ke which acts as one of the executors of the penal code, is a feminine line at the middle position of the upper trigram and at the position of masculinity, signifying a lenient person (due to the instinct of femininity) with the principle of moderation (which is available at the middle position) executes a strict penal code (as that its masculine ground is).

    The penal code of Shi Ke (21) without sentiment and reason will be like tyranny, severe and difficult to execute; therefore it must be lubricant applied with sentiment and reason. The grace (of the tender feminine applied to the rigid masculine) of the hexagram Bi (22) is that which makes it progress smoothly but must not change its essence. Therefore a gentleman should administrate public affairs with a clear mind (like brightness radiating internally and reliability remaining externally), and should not decide lawsuits vaguely, i.e. not to be misguided by their appearances (as stated in Da Xiang Zhuan: the commentary on the image of the hexagram).

    Grace is something like adding adjectives and adverbs to an article .If the grace of the hexagram Bi (21) is overdone, the feminine (the grace) will overpower the masculine (the essence) like the hexagram Bo (23): to peel away (the masculine).

    The feminine tends to overpower the masculine in the hexagram Bo (23) but is stopped by the masculine and strung like fishes. Hereafter the remaining masculine rides on a carriage and returns to the hexagram Fu (24), like the uneaten fruit falling onto earth (Kun) and starting to sprout. From the feminine line appearing in the hexagram Gou (44) and gradually increasing (in Dun 33, Pi 12 ….) to the masculine line recovering in Fu takes seven steps, and Fu to Gou, seven steps. The feminine and the masculine can never exterminate each other, which is the course of Nature; now is the timing for masculinity increasing, and friends (the other masculine lines) will join. Although masculinity is still weak but it will grow stronger without illness. On the other hand, the returned masculine is taken as goodness, and all the feminine lines in the hexagram Fu are designated to return to goodness.

    The recovery of the masculine in the hexagram Fu (24) signifies that goodness and solidity returns (Yin is taken for a symbol of emptiness, while Yang is solidity which people can feel its existence since it is visible under the brightness of Yang); solidity moving (i.e. line 1, the representative line of Wu Wang, acts in a solid manner) under the norm of Heaven (like Zhen beneath Qian) is signified as no pretense. Therefore people shouldn’t think and do what is undeserved in the hexagram of Wu Wang (25). The undeserved and unexpected calamity befalls line 3; it is not the fault of following the norm of Wu Wang, but following the norm doesn't ensure freedom from calamity.

    Regards
    Tuck
    www.iching123.com

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