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Can't remember which hexagram it was...

august moon

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I received a hexagram which included a line about someone pursuing someone else, and their faces somehow both looked similar -- the pursuer in his/her concentration and the pursued in his/her desperation to get away. And how the inferior man was trying to act like the constable and the superior man was now trying to think like a criminal.

Does anyone know which one this is? I want to re-study it.
 

bradford

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He takes on the "vibration" of his pursuit

43.3, 9 3rd, Zhi Gua 58: Dui, Satisfaction [Fan Yao 58.3: future joy, disappointing]

Vigorous in the cheekbones
Presuming the worst
The noble young one is resolved and decided
All alone in advancing, to greet the rain
As if getting wet
Were displeasure
Nothing is wrong

43.3x The noble young one (is) resolved (and) decided:
In the end no harm (is) done
 

stevev

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This is a theme ...

that's really starting to come through to me here, that each hexagram encompasses it's own opposite meaning, I remember a thread about Nourishment and Hunger, and another one that expressed the same idea. I don't know why this is so supprising to me, since I've considered this relationship so frequently in the Yin and Yang classifications, but it is.
 
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bruce_g

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that's really starting to come through to me here, that each hexagram encompasses it's own opposite meaning, I remember a thread about Nourishment and Hunger, and another one that expressed the same idea. I don't know why this is so supprising to me, since I've considered this relationship so frequently in the Yin and Yang classifications, but it is.

It's been a long turnaround for me too. The gua says: 'This is a dynamic. Now, how best to navigate it.' Brad mentioned on another thread how misleading titles and English key-words can be, and I think it's essential to get that. Flash impressions and old associations easily make only a one eyed look.
 

stevev

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Yes I've seen that ...

It's been a long turnaround for me too. The gua says: 'This is a dynamic. Now, how best to navigate it.' Brad mentioned on another thread how misleading titles and English key-words can be, and I think it's essential to get that. Flash impressions and old associations easily make only a one eyed look.

in a number of places, but you need something that expresses the general nature of the hexagram as it's tag, or label which isn't an obscure idea like "The Marrying Maiden" or "Preponderance of the Great". I guess the important thing to remember is that like in hexagram 29 Danger, the focus of the text is how to avoid it, namely Safety, or in hexagram 27. Nourishment there is the idea that it is Hunger, satisfied by nourishment.
 
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bruce_g

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Hi Steve,

Words are all we really have to communicate with, yes. While we contemplate the general meaning and specific applications of most words, we naturally take mental short cuts, which lead to wrong assumptions. Or maybe I'm the only one who does this? :)

Funny how interpretation is. My interpretation of 29 doesn't focus on safety, it focuses on the nature and lessons of danger. Avoiding the pit isn't the only way to deal with pits. The only way you can learn life's deepest lessons is through pits.
 

Trojina

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Agree with the gist of what you're both saying. Reckon I've bought way too much into focusing on hexagram name and then fixing a whole lot of things to it, storing it away mentally and pulling out the same old stuff when needed.

Yes 'preponderance of the great' has got to be the most meaningless hexagram title I can think of - well it means nothing to me.

I currently associate 29 with quite an exhilerating sense of living, not knowing what will happen, just keeping your head in the midst of the ride. I don't think 'danger' is the best word for it - yet can't think of a better one. Hmm and of course it can include actual danger, but I think is only sometimes indicating that. 'Thrills and spills' thats 29 its not all spills the thrills can be good.

Anyway the point is the title of the hexagram affects our understanding way too much i think, can't help but do, guess its the way our brains are organised - ie have broad categorys and refine under that heading. On the one hand this way of organising information enables us to store alot of info, on the other it makes us miss alot too.
 
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bruce_g

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Thrills and spills - that's funny. I like it.

An interesting thing about 28 and 29 is that old stuff gets flooded and/or washed away. We get caught up in the humdrum of life, and mighty particular about our little creature comforts, and too attentive to our mood du jour. When the flood comes, all that petty stuff is the last thing on our mind. Same with 29 (in the danger sense). When in a fight or flight mode, the senses become intensely narrow and focused (psychotacy). Nothing exists but staying alive. It's very mind clearing. Maybe that's what Steve referred to, r.e. inherent meaning of safety?
 

stevev

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Is the problem ...

one word is too many, but a thousand are not enough.

You ain't the only Bruce, I can assure you of that.

This has always been the problem with labels and stereotypes, and its well known, but I think their value is they allow you to scan and process the immense and dynamic nature of reality quickly and cheaply.

I just saw a nature doco the other night which said that baboons are able to detect a leopard in the grass by the shape of it's ears, they're not frightened by them but they know teeth and claws are attached, a sort of the tip of the iceberg thing I guess.

Another analogy for labels or names I always think of is that you don't appreciate a beach by concentrating on every grain of sand, sort of implicit fact.

Mind you I may have many others problems ;-)
 

stevev

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Ah yes youe right Bruce ...

<snip> Maybe that's what Steve referred to, r.e. inherent meaning of safety?

Though 29 has some of the same sentiment, I was getting it confused with 4.
 

stevev

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Hi Trojan,

<snip> Yes 'preponderance of the great' has got to be the most meaningless hexagram title I can think of - well it means nothing to me. <snip>

I think it competes with a few for most obscure, I'ved labeled it Excess and it has a structural similarity to 62 which I call Surplus.
 

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