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I can sail without wind

ginnie

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"I can sail without wind; I can row without oars; but I cannot part from my friend without tears" are the words carved into a long, granite monument in a New York City park. These words are generally thought to have originated in a Scandinavian folk song.

Don't these words bear an uncanny resemblance to line 11.2 (alternating to 36) of the I Ching?

I have the feeling that a lot of artists use the I Ching in their artwork, without saying so.
:)
 

chingching

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what a great observation. It also encourages me to remember the relating hex for each line too, because there still is so much in one reading for me I dont look at all the angles.
 

ginnie

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Yes, I hear echoes of the I Ching in advertising quite frequently. Ads are often more creative than the content of the film or show anyway ...
 

pocossin

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http://www.odins-gift.com/poth/U-Z/whocansail.htm

Hilary 11.2
Embracing emptiness, use this to cross the river:
Not distancing yourself from what you leave behind, Friends disappear.
Gaining honour; moving to the centre.


The song seems to be a riddle.

A bird can sail without wind.
A fish can row without oars.
 

hilary

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This isn't very related, except to the idea that there are closet Yeeks lurking everywhere... but I used to rehearse once a term in a building with one of those keypad locks. There was a two digit code to open the door:

24

I found it strangely easy to remember this from one term to the next, and I did wonder about whoever set the code.
 

ginnie

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Closet Yeeks

closet yeeks !!!!!!

:rofl:

never heard this wonderful expression before
 

mythili

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I used to keep a hexagram in my wallet as a code for my bank card.
 

hilary

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And that reminds me of how my Dad kept a note of his pin # - four letters of the Greek alphabet jotted down in the back of his diary. I expect that as a Classics teacher he'd've been happy to reward any thief who knew Greek... ;)
 

anemos

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And that reminds me of how my Dad kept a note of his pin # - four letters of the Greek alphabet jotted down in the back of his diary. I expect that as a Classics teacher he'd've been happy to reward any thief who knew Greek... ;)

:)
 

rodaki

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And that reminds me of how my Dad kept a note of his pin # - four letters of the Greek alphabet jotted down in the back of his diary.

that's a nice trick -I'll keep it in mind for jotting down numbers . .

There was a time when I used Yi readings a lot for my codes, it felt like spelling a wish and makes for a great memorizing device!
 

hilary

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Come to think of it, I have little hexagram-number mnemonics to remember a couple of automatically generated PINs. The one for the local library is sweet: a vessel for images.
 

mythili

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Y'know I think I should give up this IChing stuff for a while..............I kept saying "amplitude distribution hexagrams" today during somebody's data presentation. I meant amplitude distribution histograms........... Grrrrrrrrrrrrr!
 

hilary

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The Yijing. It will eat your brain.
 

pocossin

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Oh, Hilary, don't say that ... It might be true. And if it is true, then we're all cooked!!!

That the Yi will eat your brain is true for some, some of the time. In my case it's a brain stimulus, just as good as coffee, tea, or wine.
 

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