...life can be translucent

Menu

Recommended Hexagram Names?

celtic

visitor
Joined
Aug 20, 2011
Messages
15
Reaction score
0
I am considering memorizing the hexagram symbols and names as a method of familiarizing myself more with the content of the Yi Jing.

I was just wondering if there are any suggestions about which hexagram names to memorize. I suppose that it will come down to personal preference, but a title like Wilhelm's "Abysmal" doesn't seem to relate to me that well; perhaps the language he uses is a little outdated.

--Mike
 

bradford

Supporter
Clarity Supporter
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
2,626
Reaction score
266
There is a risk in doing that - in thinking you have the core meaning once you settle on a name. A lot of people make this mistake. Maybe it's best to stay more open and only narrow it to a few.

There are two general approaches - a Gua Ming (Hexagram Name) a) that refers to the core meanings of the Gua or b) that best translates the word or words literally. I have little sections for both on the second page of each Gua, "key words" for the former and "from the Glossary" for the latter. I personally went with the meaning rather than the literal, since I was already being literal in the translation. 18, for instance, is literally Poison, but what it's about is getting rid of the toxins. 15 is usually translated Modesty, but most of the lines are about what's wrong with our associations with modesty. Translating 12 literally as stopped or obstruction completely mistakes what the Hexagram is about - things moving away from each other, not one thing opposing another. It's a good exercise that you are proposing but I'd beware of settling too soon.
 

celtic

visitor
Joined
Aug 20, 2011
Messages
15
Reaction score
0
Thank you for your response Bradford.

Yes, I think you're right.

But it does seem impossible to become familiar with the content/structure of the book without doing something like this (whether implicitly through use, or explicitly through memorization).

I would prefer the second option, memorizing the "essence" rather than the name...or perhaps a "name" based more on the essence than a literal translation (such as 12: Moving away") while at the same time keeping this open for revision.

I guess the idea is to have a rudimentary recollection upon which to build.

--Mike
 

bamboo

visitor
Joined
Mar 9, 1971
Messages
1,484
Reaction score
22
Thank you for your response Bradford.

Yes, I think you're right.

But it does seem impossible to become familiar with the content/structure of the book without doing something like this (whether implicitly through use, or explicitly through memorization).

I would prefer the second option, memorizing the "essence" rather than the name...or perhaps a "name" based more on the essence than a literal translation (such as 12: Moving away") while at the same time keeping this open for revision.

I guess the idea is to have a rudimentary recollection upon which to build.

--Mike

after many years, I have recently made my own list of titles which for me grok the essence of each. This is the precursor to writing my own version of the Yi, I guess. But I wouldnt have done this too early on, only after reading and learning so much about the hexagrams via translators and authors and experience, too, in how the meanings played out, the experiences they described . Have fun with it, use lots of books. Brad's version would certainly be a good one to have on hand.
 

celtic

visitor
Joined
Aug 20, 2011
Messages
15
Reaction score
0
Thank you Bamboo.

I agree with you. And I don't mean to imply that I want to "make up my mind" about the meaning of a hexagram based on its title.

I re-read my post, and I don't know what happened to my synapses to post something so unclear (again). It really isn't like me..honest !

What I meant by second option was not that I preferred the direct memory route versus the implicit memory through use and experience. I meant I would prefer the name be based on the essence and not the literal translation.

It seems you got my meaning...although I don't know how...you must be psychic!

I won't even bother commenting on the lack of clarity in the rest of my post :)

--Mike
 

bamboo

visitor
Joined
Mar 9, 1971
Messages
1,484
Reaction score
22
Mike..you might be a tad too hard on yourself ;) i think your post was refreshingly clear, i had no problem understanding what you meant:)...and the idea itself makes perfect sense when one starts to study the Yi.
 

kevin

Supporter
Clarity Supporter
Joined
Jan 11, 1973
Messages
748
Reaction score
82
after many years, I have recently made my own list of titles which for me grok the essence of each. This is the precursor to writing my own version of the Yi, I guess. But I wouldn't have done this too early on, only after reading and learning so much about the hexagrams via translators and authors and experience, too, in how the meanings played out, the experiences they described . Have fun with it, use lots of books. Brad's version would certainly be a good one to have on hand.

Yes - It's all about Grok :)

We each have to find our way in... takes time... takes perseverance... I like the idea of starting with the names... Each one cautiously added after studying the whole... (Brad makes a good point)... I also suggest Ritsema/Karcher or Ritsema Sabadinni... Essential works on the different meanings of the glyphs... both superb authorities... But getting inside of the hexagram meaning and then finding the name is most definitely a good way.
 
Last edited:

celtic

visitor
Joined
Aug 20, 2011
Messages
15
Reaction score
0
Thank you Kevin. Yes I have followed the postings on Ritsema/Karcher/Sabbadini threads... I will have to get one of them. I did download Bradford's....amazing work! I also currently have Wilhelm, Karcher's Total I Ching, and Cleary's the Taoist I Ching. Since coming here I have also learned about Blofeld, and Legge...someday perhaps.

I bow to your gracious words Bamboo (love the moniker bye the way)

--Mike
 

heylise

Supporter
Clarity Supporter
Joined
Sep 15, 1970
Messages
3,125
Reaction score
140
By working with them for years, I got a connection between number and meaning. Sometimes it happens here too in posts. "Wish you lots of 35".. Or "this is a 12-situation".
The meaning is usually much wider than any name can cover. So having a number, and in your mind a range of meanings associated with that hexagram, will give you right away a clear image of what the hexagram is about.

And since (almost) every translation uses the same numbers, the problem of which one is the authority is solved.
 

bradford

Supporter
Clarity Supporter
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
2,626
Reaction score
266
The meaning is usually much wider than any name can cover. So having a number, and in your mind a range of meanings associated with that hexagram, will give you right away a clear image of what the hexagram is about.

I haven't heard that said before. It makes a lot of sense. Write that down in your book and publish it, please :)
 

celtic

visitor
Joined
Aug 20, 2011
Messages
15
Reaction score
0
heyLise.

You would recommend avoiding the symbols (Ba Gua)?

E.g. I already remember the Ba Gua by their names (Mountain, Lake, etc.) since they now remind me of the 'shape' of the trigrams.

So, it would be a fairly easy task to memorize the numbers, symbols, and an initial range of meanings for each hexagram.
 

heylise

Supporter
Clarity Supporter
Joined
Sep 15, 1970
Messages
3,125
Reaction score
140
No! I remember many hexagrams by their trigrams.

I know the combination of the numbers and the meanings. Nr. 5 is waiting, but also needing, nr. 15 is modesty and also adding your talents and also using the talents of others. That is my combination of number with meaning.

The lines are for me much harder to remember, but I know now by heart that 50 is fire over wind/wood, 48 water over wind/wood, 5 water over heaven. I know the trigram lines, so then the hexagrams are also easy. Slowly I am now learning to remember all of them with the help of the trigrams. Always felt silly that after so many years I still did not know which lines the hexagrams have, or which hexagram a particular stack of lines was.
 

celtic

visitor
Joined
Aug 20, 2011
Messages
15
Reaction score
0
Thank you Lise, that was very clear...I think the Ba Gua are important too :)

And that is essentially what I want to do...
upon getting a hexagram symbol, know some basic meanings associated with the symbol and its number, then I can instantly look it up for further study, and over time accumulate further associations with the hexagram number, the constituent trigrams, and the Hexagram symbol.
 

bradford

Supporter
Clarity Supporter
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
2,626
Reaction score
266
Mike
I have a pdf copy of a flyer done in 1999 by the late Alan drake (Kumoyama, Way of the Junzi) that summarizes the 64 Hexagram names given in 50 different English translations. Write me a private message here at Clarity and include your Email address if you want me to send you a copy.
 

Clarity,
Office 17622,
PO Box 6945,
London.
W1A 6US
United Kingdom

Phone/ Voicemail:
+44 (0)20 3287 3053 (UK)
+1 (561) 459-4758 (US).

Top