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Yi rhyme scheme?

thinbuddha

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I have read in a couple places that the Chinese Yi has a rhyme scheme, but haven't found any details regarding that... Does anyone know where I can find out more about this? I would be interested in knowing as much detail as I can find.

-tb
 

bradford

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I have read in a couple places that the Chinese Yi has a rhyme scheme, but haven't found any details regarding that... Does anyone know where I can find out more about this? I would be interested in knowing as much detail as I can find.
-tb
If you have the doctoral dissertations of Richard Kunst and Edward Shaughnessy, there is some material there. Rhyme wasn't a big driving force in the composition, but there is some, especially where the Yi borrowed little folk ditties from the broader culture. I wouldn't trust some of the others, like Rutt or Gottshalk, because they are too free in changing the text around to suit or support their theories. There's still some conjecture about what the words used to sound like. Harmen might know something more about this.
 

fkegan

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King Wen Sequence in terms of Overall structure of the I Ching:

Hi Thinbuddha,

The hexagram line patterns are more of a rhyme scheme than the text. The King Wen Sequence is composed of 32 pairs by line structure with each even-numbered hexagram being the inverse by line structure of the preceding odd-numbered hexagram.

When the KWS is displayed in an 8 x 8 checkerboard it is impossible to figure out either the origin or the meaning of the sequence. This led Legge to call it "occult" and others to try to apply modern geography or statistics or binary computer stuff or DNA math. It is however quite simple and amazingly elegant in the ancient math of Natural numbers and multiple philosophical perspectives (Monad, Dyad, Triad, Tetrad).

To begin, look at the line patterns one after another. There isn't a proper diagram of the 64 hexagrams in sequence order in Wilhelm. It does have the text divided into two halves after hex 30.
The whole structure is:
The Yi is divided into 2 halves. The first half is simply three decads or sets of ten hexagrams 1-30. The very first two hexagrams are the primal pair of all Yang lines and all Yin lines.<br><br>

This makes three decads with the final four hexagrams 27,28, 29, and 30 being symmetrical to tumbling and therefore the inverse achieved by changing all their lines Yang-to-Yin and Yin-to-Yang.<br><br>

The second half begins with hex 31 and consists of 3 more sets of 10 to hexagram 60. All these hexagrams form their inverse pair by tumbling the odd numbered hexagram to achieve the following even numbered hexagram. There are four extra final hexagrams, all symmetrical by tumbling and these pairs are formed again by changing all their lines.

The last of the 64 hexagrams is about new beginnings, thus there is a hopeful final hexagram. The final pair, hexagrams 63 and 64 are the total opposite of the first pair. Rather than all Yang and all Yin, they are totally mixed Yang and Yin with the opposite hexagram being the nuclear hexagram of each of them.

The Flux Tome perspective offers a template to explain the meaning of each individual hexagram in light of its numbered position within sets of ten. The key to this template is the philosophical definition of the Tetraktys equation as ‘the full exposition of a subject requires the combination of the detailed analysis in terms of the Monad, Dyad, Triad, and Tetrad or in dot math 10= 1+2+3+4.

That is the rhyme scheme of the I Ching.

Frank
 

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